What happens to your Police pension when you die?

Your Police pension offers a number of valuable benefits to your surviving family members when you die - including pensions for your dependants and, in some circumstances,  a death grant. Select from the options below to see the qualifying criteria for each of the different Police pension schemes.

Police Pension Scheme 2015

Survivor pensions

When you die, a pension will be paid to your surviving spouse, civil partner or nominated partner. The amount payable would depend on whether you're a serving member, your pension is deferred or you’re already receiving a pension from the scheme.

Spouse's or partner's pensions are payable for life. Children can receive a pension from the scheme until they’re 18 – or until they’re 23 if they’re still in full-time education. Children are no longer eligible if they marry, form a civil partnership or take up paid employment. Children who are permanently disabled at the time of the member’s death may be entitled to receive a pension for life. Full eligibility details are available from Police Scotland.

For serving members, survivor pensions are based on half of the upper-tier ill-health pension the member would have received if they’d retired on health grounds on the date of their death.

For people who have left the 2015 Scheme, survivor payments are based on the deferred pension entitlement.

For members who already receive a pension from the 2015 Scheme, your surviving qualifying partner will be paid half the net pension you were awarded at the date of retirement.

In each case, the survivors are entitled to the following proportion of the member’s entitlement:

Spouse or partner: half

Single child: quarter

Three or more eligible children: half, shared equally between them

If the spouse or partner is more than 12 years younger than the deceased, the spouse or partner's pension will be reduced by 2.5% for every year above the 12 years, to a maximum of 50%.

If the deceased leaves no eligible spouse or partner but there is an eligible child or children, an additional pension would be paid to the child/children equivalent to that which would have been paid to an eligible spouse or partner. If there is more than one child the additional pension would be divided equally between the children. This pension stops when the children are no longer eligible.

Death grant

Scheme members who are actively paying into their pension when they die in service normally qualify for a death grant equal to three times their pensionable pay.

There are some exceptions to this, including taking account of variable working hours.

Post-retirement two year guarantee

In the event of death within two years of a pension coming into payment, there’s a two year guarantee. This means any balance between pension payments already paid and the total that would have been paid in the first two years of retirement, would be paid as a lump sum.

Police Pension Scheme 2006

Survivor pensions

When you die, a pension will be paid to your surviving spouse, civil partner or nominated partner. The amount payable would depend on whether you're a serving member, your pension is deferred or you’re already receiving a pension from the scheme.

Spouse's or partner's pensions are payable for life. Children can receive a pension from the scheme until they’re 18 – or until they’re 23 if they’re still in full-time education. Children are no longer eligible if they marry, form a civil partnership or take up paid employment. Children who are permanently disabled at the time of death may be entitled to receive a pension for life. Full eligibility details are available from Police Scotland.

For serving members, survivor pensions are based on upper-tier ill-health pension the member would have received if they’d retired on health grounds on the date of their death.

For people who have left the PPS 2006 Scheme, survivor payments are based on the deferred pension entitlement.

For members who already receive a pension from the PPS 2006 Scheme, survivor pensions are based on value of the member’s net pension before any reduction for early payment.

In each case, the survivors are entitled to the following proportion of the member’s entitlement:

Spouse or partner: half

Single child: quarter

Three or more eligible children: half, shared equally between them.

If the spouse or partner is more than 12 years younger than the deceased, the spouse or partner's pension will be reduced by 2.5% for every year or part year over the 12 years, to a maximum of 50%.

If the deceased leaves no eligible spouse or partner but there is an eligible child or children, an additional pension would be paid to the child/children equivalent to that which would have been paid to an eligible spouse or partner. If there is more than one child the additional pension would be divided equally between the children. This pension stops when the children are no longer eligible.

First thirteen weeks’ top up

For the first 13 weeks following death, the spouse's or partner's pension will be topped up to the level of the deceased's pensionable pay (death in service) or the pension in payment (death after pension comes into payment). This top-up does not apply in the case of a deferred pension. If no spouse's or partner's pension is payable but a child's pension is due, the top-up would be applied to the child's pension.

Death grant

Scheme members who are actively paying into their pension when they die in service normally qualify for a death grant equal to three times their pensionable pay.

There are some exceptions to this including taking account of variable working hours.

Although you can nominate who you would like to benefit, Police Scotland has absolute discretion as to who will receive the death grant.

Police Pension Scheme 1987

Survivor pensions

When you die, a pension will be paid to your surviving spouse or civil partner. The amounts payable depend on whether you're a serving member, your pension is deferred or you’re already receiving a pension from the scheme.

Spouse's or partner's pensions are payable for life. Dependent children can receive a pension from the scheme until they’re 18 – or until they’re 23 if they’re still in full-time education. Children are no longer eligible if they marry, form a civil partnership or take up paid employment. Children who are permanently disabled at the time of death may be entitled to receive a pension for life. Full eligibility details are available from Police Scotland.

For serving members, survivor pensions are based on the lower and higher-tier ill health pensions the member would have received if they’d retired on ill health grounds on the date of their death.

For people who have left the PPS 1987 Scheme, survivor payments are based on the deferred pension entitlement.

For those who already receive a pension from the PPS 1987 Scheme, survivor pensions are based on the value of the member’s pension before any reduction for early payment but after commutation. (Commutation is giving up an amount of pension payable in retirement in exchange for a lump sum.)

In each case, the survivors are entitled to the following proportion of the member’s entitlement:

Spouse or partner: half of the officer's pension (before commutation)

Single child: 18.75%

More than one eligible child: pay cannot exceed 35.7% of pension

First thirteen weeks’ top up

For the first 13 weeks following death, the spouse's or partner's pension will be topped up to the level of the deceased's pensionable pay (death in service) or the pension in payment (death after pension comes into payment). This top-up does not apply in the case of a deferred pension. If no spouse's or partner's pension is payable but a child's pension is due, the top-up would be applied to the child's pension.

Death grant

Scheme members who are actively paying into their pension when they die in service normally qualify for a death grant equal to two times their pensionable pay.

There are some exceptions to this including taking account of variable working hours.

Although you can nominate who you would like to benefit, Police Scotland has absolute discretion as to who will receive the death grant.

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